Thornhill by Kathleen Peacock

thornhill kathleen peacock

“Thornhill” by Kathleen Peacock

2 1/2 out of 5 stars.

Goodreads Summary:

Mac can’t lose another friend. Even if he doesn’t want to be found.

The ripple effect caused by Mac’s best friend Amy’s murder has driven Mac’s new love, Kyle, to leave Hemlock and disappear from her life forever. But Mac knows that Kyle plans to enroll in a rehabilitation camp, where he can live with other werewolves. She refuses to accept his decision, especially since the camps are rumored to be tortuous. So she sets out in search of Kyle with a barely sober Jason—and Amy’s all-seeing ghost—in tow.

Clues lead Mac to find Kyle in a werewolf den in Colorado—but their reunion is cut short by a Tracker raid. Now Mac and Kyle are trapped inside the electric fences of Thornhill, a camp for young werewolves. As she devises an escape plan, Mac uncovers dangerous secrets buried within the walls of Thornhill—and realizes that the risk to the people she loves is greater than ever before

Where do I begin? I loved “Hemlock” by Kathleen Peacock sooooo much. Yeah, sure it was kinda like a CW drama, but I found it to be very entertaining. It was cute and fun, and I didn’t care that it wasn’t some deep, philosophical read; it was good quality fluff, and I liked it. So, with liking “Hemlock” so much, I was very much looking forward to “Thornhill” for many reasons, but two of them being:

(1) I really wanted Kathleen Peacock to make me torn between Kyle and Jason.

(2) I needed some delightful fluff to read; I have read quite a few books recently that have been super dark and serious, and I just needed a break from that kind of drama.

All I wanted was a light, entertaining read that left me smiling and happy. Sadly for me, it was not meant to be, and you can probably tell that from the fact that I used the goodreads summary; I couldn’t even muster enough energy or interest to write that part of my review.

“Thornhill” was very different from “Hemlock” in feeling; while reading it I felt…I actually don’t know exactly what I felt. All I know is that “Thornhill” didn’t give me that happy, “I don’t care that this book is like a CW show” feeling that “Hemlock” had. Instead, “Thornhill” turned into one of the CW shows that I want to remove from TV and my memory. Gosh! I am sounding mean…I am not trying to be mean because it is a well written book, it just WAS NOT for me. Okay, aside from the whole “not feeling it” thing, the characters were way different from the first book.

My intelligent sister pointed out to me that Mac and Kyle had only been apart about a week; Mac herself says that she and Jason knew exactly where Kyle was going, so all they had to do was find out where he was staying. So, how long does it take to drive from Hemlock to Denver, Colorado? A max of a week, people!! Mac seems to be very different aside from the fact that she is still a worthless heroine (she only gets herself and others into trouble). In “Hemlock” I could handle Mac. Sure, she was a drama queen, but I was okay with her. But in “Thornhill” it was Mac on crack. Everything she did was like stupid Mac from “Hemlock” to the tenth power! After thirty pages, her obsession with finding Kyle, being with Kyle, saving Kyle was driving me up the wall. In this book, Mac was once again useless to the plot, and was the one who had set into motion the Wheel of Misfortune that nearly decimated all of her friends in this book. Practically everything bad that happens is a ripple effect of Mac being irrational and impulsive. STAAAAAPPPP TOUCHING THINGS, MAC!!!!!!

Now, off of Mac and onto the character of Kyle. I have to say, he kind of stunk. Flat liner is the easiest was to put his character in “Thornhill”; Kyle wasn’t even Kyle in this book. There was no character developement on his part, and at times I even felt like his character somehow devolved as the story progressed. The sad thing is I was a Kyle fan in the first book. I thought he was a good and sweet friend and that he and Mac were fairly good together, but he wasn’t himself anymore, even though it has only been a week and a half (at max) since he last saw Mac. And what is with this whole “leaving” thing? Isn’t it more suspicious to run away without your parents knowledge than to just staying in Hemlock, acting like your usual, mostly human self? Personally, if I were Mac, I would feel a bit betrayed over the fact that we had been through so much together, and then once everyone is “safe” he picks up and leaves? Call me crazy, but I wouldn’t be okay with that. Yeah, sure it is understandable to want to find your friend and make sure they are safe, but I would be wary to enter into a romantic relationship when he is ready to pick up and leave me at any time, and without warning.

Last, but certainly not least, I wan to talk about Jason. Ahhhhhhh, I loved him in this book. I would be team Jason, but, much to my dismay, there technically is no team Jason, though Kathleen may want you to think that there is. But let me assure (or disappoint in my case) you, there is no love triangle, or at least it didn’t seem like a love triangle because Mac is too blind to see that Jason is a just as viable option as Kyle. But noooooo, she has only eyes for the guy who left her! Why, I ask you, must I always like the person that never wins? I always choose the losers (they’re the better character but they never get the girl), and I hope and hope that this amazing character will win, and then I am dashed to pieces once again. I expected it, but I still had hoped they would succeed. Jason is another one of those characters. He was the only one in “Thornhill” who actually had any amount of character growth, and yet he is cast aside by Mac, and even the author, it felt like. Jason was the only one who kept me going during this book; it was really slow despite the fact that it is nearly seventy-five pages less than “Hemlock”, and then he is just discarded (even though he LOVES Mac) at the end like a used up tissue.

give mama a hug

I’ll love you Jason even if Mac won’t. I wiiiillll!!!!! I was (again) torn to shreds by an author who had a fantastic opportunity to create an amazing love triangle; we all could have been torn between the two guys, and I wanted to be torn, but instead I just ended up hating the winner and loving the guy who never even stood a chance. I lost. Again.

weeping

“Thornhill” is not a bad book; it is actually quite well written, but it was/is not my kind of book, and it broke my heart to see another author waste such a great character like Jason on a non-existent love triangle. Just make him a super awesome friend so I don’t build up false hope!

I will read the third book because I want to know where Jason ends up and how Serena does, but I couldn’t care less about Mac and Kyle. *Sighs* I don’t want to be mean, and I am sorry if this review is, it’s just that I had something (and Jason) that I loved ripped away is a very unsatisfactory way. I can handle losing, but this isn’t the way I wanted to go down. If nothing else, though, read this book for Jason because he was wicked awesome (and I love him). What is wrong with loving a human, Mac??!!!!! *weeping*

jensen

I have nothing against Kyle and his wolf side ( I actually liked him a lot in the first book), but he just felt so different, and Kathleen Peacock didn’t add anything to his character in the second book; he felt shallow and lackluster in “Thornhill”, whereas he was sweet and endearing in “Hemlock”. Oh, well, sorry about the negative review.

Side Note: This book is fairly well written and deserves a 3 for writing quality, but I really just hated it and I am truly sorry for that.

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