Les Petits Bonheurs #26…

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“Lire, c’est toujours une bonne idée.”

(Reading is always a good idea.)

This is my goal for the weekend: a delightful book with some powerful coffee in hand, and no school books or work to be dealt with. Crossing our fingers…

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Les Petits Bonheurs #25…

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This will be my last les petits bonheurs post before college recommences, which is pretty crazy! Summer break went SO fast, and although I kept busy, I feel like my attempt at blogging more consistently went down the proverbial toilette one week into my summer resolution. I did a fair amount of rereading books, but there were not a lot of new releases that caught my attention this summer, so I have been severely lacking in creativity and inspiration to write a review. This fall, however, seems to hold some promising up-coming releases like “Crooked Kingdoms” by Leigh Bardugo and “The Lovely Reckless” by Kami Garcia among others, and I am looking forward to just finding another book and world to get lost in. Until then, I bid you all adieu!

P.S. I do have two reviews that are in the works, so hopefully I will have one up for you by the end of this week or the start of next week.

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P.S. I Like You by Kasie West

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“P.S. I Like You” by Kasie West

4 out of 5 stars.

Goodreads summary:

What if the person you were falling for was a total mystery?

While Lily is spacing out in Chemistry one day, she picks up her pencil and scribbles a line from one of her favorite songs on the desk. The next day, someone else has written back to her on the desk! Soon enough Lily and the mystery student are exchanging notes, and lyrics, and even sharing secrets. When Lily finds out that her anonymous pen pal is a guy, she’s flustered — and kind of feels like she’s falling for him. She and her best friend set out to unravel the identity of the letter writer — but when the truth is revealed, the guy is the LAST person Lily could have ever imagined it to be. Now that Lily knows the truth, can she untangle her feelings and gather the courage to listen to her heart?

From beloved author Kasie West (The Distance Between Us) comes an utterly charming story about mixed messages, missed connections, and the magic of good old-fashioned secret admirer notes.

This review is going to be short and (hopefully) sweet. “P.S. I Like You” was the perfect summertime fluff, and I just adore Kasie West as an author for how she consistently delivers adorable, heart-warming YA contemporary novels. I love how entertaining and engaging Kasie’s books always are, and “P.S. I Like You” was so charming and sweet, from it fun characters to its fabulously adorable cover, that I couldn’t put it down! (P.S. I want the filter that they used for the cover shoot. It’s like the unicorn of filters, leaving magic in its wake!)

Lily was a pretty relatable teen character, and I liked how Kasie West made Lily’s family a key part of “P.S. I Like You”; there were no disappearing parents or lack of supervision on their part, and I appreciate how “real” the family dynamics came across in this book. It was refreshing to read about a high school girl who had boundaries and limits because she was underage, and I enjoyed the fact that Lily owned up to her familial obligations, rather than being the overdone rebellious teen who ditched her family so that she could do whatever she wanted. I also liked that Kasie wrote a more realistic teenager by having her character’s parents not buy her a car, or with how Lily had to babysit to get her beloved guitar. Most YA contemporaries have these rebellious teens as their stars, and the kids have cars and/or family’s with money, but somehow zero parental supervision. It was refreshing to see the other, more average side to YA contemporary that Kasie West chose to show, and I feel like Kasie approach in this book made me enjoy her character and her journey even more as a reader.

Besides Lily being a fairly relatable character because of her realistic (and average) lifestyle, I thought that Kasie did a great job of showing her character grow as an individual. Lily had some things that she needed to work through in “P.S. I Like You,” and although they weren’t insurmountable problems, they were realistic to some of the issues that high schoolers deal with in this generation. I also thought that the letters were pretty cute, despite the fact that Lily’s “Dear John” was easy to spot.

*Sighs* About Lily’s Dear John…Although the letters were cute, I’m not sure that I bought into the boy outside of his letters to Lily; they were sweet and all, but how he behaved in reality didn’t appeal to me as a reader. For most of this book the boy behind the letters was cute, but the entire time I was wondering how Kasie was going to make me like the actual Dear John, who I did not initially like in “P.S. I Like You.” I know he’d had a rough past and it explained a few of the things that he did, but I still felt like it was more of an excuse than anything else for how he acted during the first half of this book.

Despite not completely buying into Lily’s letter-writer, I did see some similarities between “P.S. I Like You” and “Pride and Prejudice,” although I do not believe Kasie West intended her novel to mirror the classic literature piece. Some of the pride and prejudices between the main characters and the initial rudeness of the Dear John character reminded me a little bit of those same themes in Austen’s novel. I get that this book’s premise was that there’s always more to a person’s story, and that sometimes our perceptions and judgments of a someone can be wrong, as was the case with Dear John. But I do wish that I’d had more time with the real Dear John that Lily fell for, because I liked that version a lot, instead of “seeing” mostly the jerk that Lily’s point of view initially portrayed him as. I guess my perception of this character was slightly skewed because I had been reading about how much Lily disliked him, even though I knew he was going to be the romantic interest. Maybe when I read this book again, I will like Dear John a bit more because I will have a better understanding of his character, and can then forgive his Darcy-esk style of hiding his feelings, when he actually genuinely cared for people. It may take me some time, but I can get there…

Overall, “P.S. I like You” was a really sweet, quick read. I liked Lily and the personal growth that she showed by the end of this book, and I appreciated Kasie West’s choice in how prominent a role Lily’s family played in “P.S. I Like You,” and it was refreshing to see a more realistic family dynamic in a YA contemporary novel. My only disappointment with this book was that I did not fall head-over-heels for the main guy character; the boy behind the letters took ¾ of the book to “show up,” and I felt like I was deprived of really getting to know him like I wanted to, because his letter were all I had to make me like him for most of this book. Other than not being in love with the Dear John character of “P.S. I Like You,” I did really like this book in its entirety, and I really admire Kasie West for her consistency in writing such adorable and good quality YA contemporary novels.

P.S. Do yourself a favor and end your summer on a sweet note by picking “P.S. I Like” and reading it. You won’t regret it!

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Amy and Roger’s Epic Detour by Morgan Matson

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“Amy and Roger’s Epic Detour” by Morgan Matson

3 1/2 out of 5 stars.

Goodreads summary:

Amy Curry is not looking forward to her summer. Her mother decided to move across the country and now it’s Amy’s responsibility to get their car from California to Connecticut. The only problem is, since her father died in a car accident, she isn’t ready to get behind the wheel. Enter Roger. An old family friend, he also has to make the cross-country trip – and has plenty of baggage of his own. The road home may be unfamiliar – especially with their friendship venturing into uncharted territory – but together, Amy and Roger will figure out how to map their way.”

So, my plans for this summer have included an epic detour of mostly rereading my favorite books and some new YA contemporary novels, so I thought that it would be the perfect time to pick up “Amy and Roger’s Epic Detour” by Morgan Matson.

Morgan Matson’s debut Ya book felt like a little slice of summer inside of a book. It was fun and adventurous, while also having a surprising weight to the storyline because of Amy’s newly chaotic and broken life, which was the result of her father’s passing. The travel aspects of this book were so great, and the details that went into the design of “Amy and Roger’s Epic Detour” was perfect; it felt like an adorable summer journal with all of the random receipts and pictures and fabulous playlists, and with how there were moments of personal revelation.

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I loved the fact that I read Morgan’s book right after “Love and Gelato” by Jenna Evans Welch because of how both books made for fantastic travel “destinations,” and now I really want to take an adventure, whether it be driving across the country or backpacking through Europe. Fun adventures aside, the characters of “Amy and Roger’s Epic Detour” were also really great, and I enjoyed the fact that it centered around just Amy and Roger because of how short a period of time this book spanned.

I liked reading Amy’s perspective, and despite the terribly sad and heartbreaking circumstances which led up to her being forced to travel with Roger, I never felt like this book was too heavy or depressing. “Amy and Roger’s Epic Detour” definitely tugged on my heartstrings as Amy learned to feel alive again after feeling so horribly broken after her father’s tragic accident, but those sad moments never overshadowed the fact that this book was about adventure, doing things out of your comfort zone, and learning something new about yourself and the world and people who are around you. Amy had an enjoyable perspective to read from, and I liked the fact that her story added depth and weight to what could have been just a fluff contemporary. It was nice to see a character who experienced a lot of growth as an individual, even if it was a tiny bit over-reaching considering how little time “Amy and Roger’s Epic Detour” took place over. Amy was great, and I enjoyed how she and Roger got to know each other as they explored some of the hidden jems of the United States.

Roger was pretty adorable. He reminded me a little bit of Frank Porter from Morgan Matson’s book, “Since You’ve Been Gone,” and he ended up being a cute, good guy, with just a sprinkle of mystery surrounding him at the beginning of this book. I liked how he helped Amy come out from behind her protective walls, and they were pretty cute together. I did, however, feel like their romance developed a little too quickly for the short time period that “Amy and Roger”s Epic Detour” took place over, but since I had so much fun reading and learning about all of the amazing places that Amy and Roger went, I let it slide.

“Amy and Roger’s Epic Detour” was a great summer read, and I’m so glad that I finally picked it up this summer. Morgan Matson is a great contemporary writer, and I think that she always finds a good balance sweet and sentimental with some good coming of age fun. “Since You’ve Been Gone” is still my favorite Morgan Matson book, but “Amy and Roger’s Epic Detour” was still a really sweet and enjoyable read. There’s not much else I can say about “Amy and Roger’s Epic Detour,” other than recommend it to anyone looking for a fun, enjoyable coming of age story with some fabulous road mixes to pass the time. 😉

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Love and Gelato by Jenna Evans Welch

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“Love and Gelato” by Jenna Evans Welch

4 1/2 out of 5 stars.

Summer in Tuscany, Italy would be an adventure of a lifetime to most people, but Lina is not one of them. The magic of Italy is lost on Lina because her visit to the beautiful country is only to fulfill her mother’s dying wish for her to get to know her father.

Nothing is ideal or appealing about her trip to Italy, but when Lina is given her mother’s old journal, she discovers what a magical time her mother had had in the romantic country. Reading through her mother’s journal leads Lina on a whirlwind adventure to uncovering the beauty, art, and secrets that her own mother experienced over a decade ago. Each entry of the journal takes her somewhere new, and soon Lina finds herself lost to the magic of the Italian countryside, despite the pain and sorrow that had painted her life for the last year. But as she follows the trail her mother left for in the journal, Lina finds out earth shattering truths about the woman whose every secret she thought she knew, and she wonders how her mother could have kept those kinds of secrets from her. As the mystery of her mother’s past in Italy unfolds, Lina discovers the true reason behind why her mother had loved Italy despite leaving it, and through uncovering her mother’s past, Lina might just find her way forward.

Have I ever told you that I’m a fiend when it comes to anything Italian? I find nearly everything about that country to be charming and interesting, so whenever an opportunity arises to read a book that takes place in the beautiful country, I am ready to dive right in! I have yet to experience a true Italian vacation, but for now reading about the stunning landscape and charming people and culture will have to do until I can experience it for myself.

I adored “Love and Gelato” by Jenna Evans Welch because it felt like I got to visit Tuscany and like I had the opportunity to explore the stunning city of Florence. Jenna Evans Welch’s descriptions of the Italian countryside were amazing and made the story and region of Italy it took place in come alive, and this book felt like the closest alternative to an Italian summer to actually traveling there myself. Let’s just say it was magical imagining the beauty of the rolling hills and stunning landscape that Lina, the main character, got to wake up to each morning.

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Oh, yeah, and did I mention Florence yet? I might have swooned over the descriptive writing that Jenna used when telling her readers about the beautiful and historic city of Florence. Jenna Evans Welch painted such a stunningly clear Florence for me that I could see and feel the city all around me, and I loved how this book truly gave me the travel bug, especially when she described the Duomo.

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It felt like I got a tiny history and architecture lesson from reading “Love and Gelato,” which I absolutely adored, and after reading this book, I want to experience the city of Florence and all of Tuscany for myself!

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“Love and Gelato” by Jenna Evans Welch is the best contemporary book that I have read for travel; it felt like I got a private tour of Italy while also reading a heartwarming story about a girl healing from loss and discovering who she is. Alright, enough about the amazing travel aspects of “Love and Gelato,” because there was so much more to Jenna’s book than just stunning scenery!

I have been on a YA contemporary reading craze lately. After having read quite a few heavy/serious fantasy novels, I felt this need to find as many sweet, summery reads as I could, and “Love and Gelato” was the first one that I got my hands on, thanks to my sister loaning her copy to me. Needless to say, I loved this book so much, from its beautiful descriptions, heartwarming story, and sweet summertime feeling, that I bought myself a copy!

YA contemporary is usually not my preferred genre, but some truly fantastic authors have persuaded me to give it a chance, and books within this the contemporary genre have slowly found their way onto my bookshelf. I love fairly serious and thought-provoking books or characters that are impacting and linger long after I have put them down, but sometimes I just need a little sweetness in life that gives me a safe escape from my troubles, and “Love and Gelato” was exactly that. This book was the perfectly light and heartwarming journey that a summer afternoon requires, but it was also more, and I feel like I am shorting Jenna Evans Welch by saying that it was just a fluffy summer read. “Love and Gelato” was sweetness itself, but it also had an unexpected depth to it at times that was the result of Jenna having her protagonist dealing with the loss of her mother. “Love and Gelato” made me feel happy and lighthearted with the beauty of the Italian countryside, but there were also moments when it made my heart ache and tears come to my eyes, especially during the last twenty or thirty pages. I really appreciated the ease in which Jenna Evans Welch pulled me into the story that she was telling, and by how she caused me as a reader to feel emotionally connect to her characters.

Lina was a likeable contemporary protagonist, and my heart hurt for her and the loss that she was dealing with because of her mother’s passing. The way that Jenna Evans Welch wrote this book and her main character made me enjoy Lina’s journey, and I liked the fact that Lina did not pull the universe-is-against-me card; I don’t personally like the fact that she was traipsing around a foreign all alone for a few days without any knowledge of the language or culture, but I never got annoyed with Lina, either. I got why she did not want to be in Italy, and Jenna Evans Welch handled the situation of loss well within her contemporary novel.

There was, unfortunately, insta-love between Lina and a young man who she meets in Italy, and that was truly the only thing that I rolled my eyes at while reading “Love and Gelato.” That and the fact that Lina did not know what gelato was.

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Fortunately, though, the insta-love and the severely lacking knowledge of delicious food did not ruin the story of “Love and Gelato “for me. Lina’s journey was cute and heartwarming, if a little quick for my taste, and I just wish that this book had taken place over a longer period of time, because personal growth comes with time. Lina’s story was sweet, but it only took a few days in Italy for her to discover who she was and to come to the point where she could begin to heal from the loss of her mother. It was still a great and heartwarming coming of age story, but I just wish it hadn’t happened so fast for this book’s protagonist, especially since I wanted to see Lina get to know Howard more.

Howard, Lina’s long-lost father and the reason she came to Italy, was such a good, charming, and endearing character. I wish that there had more of him because he brought so much to this book. Jenna Evans Welch did such an amazing job writing Howard, and his character honestly brought tears to my eyes while reading the end of this book. Lots of tears. Multiple times.

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Howard’s story was so interesting as well as sad, and I loved how much he cared for Lina and wanted to get to know her. I’ve definitely come to the point in my life where I fall for the adult characters and am on their side instead of the rebellious teenager’s. And let me tell you, the other side looks pretty good. 😉

Overall, “Love and Gelato” was a sweet, heartwarming summer read. I enjoyed reading Jenna’s amazing descriptions of Tuscany and learning about the city of Florence, and I hope to someday have a stamp in my passport that says,”Italy,” on it. Welch’s writing style in “Love and Gelato” was easy to read while being extremely impacting, and I enjoyed the whole experience of reading this book, from its characters to its stunning setting. If you want to read a good story or just catch the travel bug, you have to read “Love and Gelato”!

Sweet Temptation by Wendy Higgins (The Sweet Trilogy #4)

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“Sweet Temptation” by Wendy Higgins

5 out of 5 stars.

Having everything at your fingertips can be fun. Being able to party, take what he wants without consequences, and a dad rich enough to change the rules when he breaks them makes it seem as if rich, bad boy Kaidan Rowe has it all. But appearances in the world can be deceiving, especially when you’re the son of a fallen angel.

Kaidan’s purpose as a Nephilim is to darken the world by making mankind give into temptation, and Kaidan has never been bother by his “job” too much. Sure, he has experienced momentary guilt, but that is a feeling that has to be stamped out and ignored, because to survive in his world, you have to be willing break people and cause them stumble, otherwise a Duke with come for the disobedient Nephilim. Kaidan’s fear of death has always been stronger than his desire to do good, so he has chosen to survive in the only way he knew how. But that all changes when he meets Anna Whitt.

Kaidan has always known his place in the Neph world, but after meeting Anna, something within him begins to shift. Getting to know her and choosing to help her discover why she is different from him and the other Neph begins to matter more to Kaidan than obeying his awful father, and through knowing her, Kaidan realizes that he wants to do more than just survive his life sentence. But after eighteen years spent doing wrong and hurting people, Kaidan wonders if someone as broken as he is can hope to have a better future?

I had heard great things about Wendy Heggins’s “Sweet Trilogy” from my sister, as well as other readers and bloggers, and last fall, just after the release of  “Sweet Temptation,” I had been experiencing a dry spell in reading material and had decided to pick up the first book in Wendy’s trilogy, “Sweet Evil.” After reading and enjoying the first book, I kept going with this trilogy and ended up discovering that “Sweet Temptation,” a companion novel to the “Sweet Trilogy,” was my favorite of the four books.

 The first three books of the “Sweet Series” were pretty good, especially “Sweet Peril,” and I had loved Anna as a heroine because of her sweetness and dedication to doing what was right in the face of great obstacles. Anna was a wonderful protagonist and I enjoyed her perspective a lot, but there was just something about reading from Kaidan’s point of view that really rounded out this entire trilogy for me. Three books were crammed into just “Sweet Temptation,” and it filled in the parts of this the “Sweet Trilogy” where Kai was absent, as well as some other really key scenes, which could have ended up being too much for one novel. But while reading this book, I never felt like it was rushed, or as if random things were put into it to link up with the other books; “Sweet Temptation” actually felt like it was more rounded out and far more complete than “Sweet Reckoning,” which I personally thought read like it was rushed. While reading “Sweet Evil” and “Sweet Peril,” I always wanted to know where Kaidan really stood, what he was thinking and doing during important moments in Wendy’s series, but I could only get so much from Anna point of view. I wanted to understand Kai for myself, instead of through Anna’s perception of him, and with Sweet Temptation,” I got that and so much more. I loved how this book made the rest of the series come together and feel more whole and complete, and as great as Anna was, Kai’s perspective was a hundred times better!

Kaidan Rowe…

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Yeah, I kind of loved reading this boy’s perspective, and I thought that Wendy Higgins did such a good job of writing this complex and dynamic character. I feel that sometimes certain authors lose the feeling and connection formed between a reader and a beloved character when they write from a different character’s perspective, and it’s an awful feeling when a voice switches and the character who you knew so well feels like an entirely different person. Wendy, however, did a fabulous job of taking the Kaidan I knew from the first three books through Anna’s eyes and giving him his own voice. Kai still seemed like Kai, and I felt like I got the chance to not only grow to love this character even more than I already did, but to also understand him so much better.

I loved and hated seeing Kai struggle and suffer as a Nephilim. I hated seeing little pieces of his soul be chipped away due to his “inheritance” as a Neph, but I loved the opportunity to understand and uncover who this boy was firsthand; it was heartbreaking and sad to read, but I loved seeing him and the environment he was raised in, because it helped me to understand why he responded the way he did in certain situations. Kaidan was broken when Anna first met him, and he hated himself and the life that he lived, despite the persona he had shaped for himself. He acted like a bad boy and was wicked on occasion, but he had a good heart and just needed someone to show him that there was a way out of that kind of life, and seeing Anna do that for him from Kai’s perspective made this trilogy even better.

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Besides just loving “Sweet Temptation” because I could see and feel what Kai went through during the “Sweet Trilogy,” this book also made me like Anna and Kai’s relationship all the more.

Yes, Anna and Kai’s romance was definitely swoony in the previous books, but I loved them together even more after reading “Sweet Temptation” because I could see through Kai’s eyes how much he loved Anna, and how hard he fought to protect her and tried to change to be worthy of her. Obviously Anna loved Kaidan long before he ever started to turn his life around, but seeing him fighting against all that he had ever known and struggling with how ashamed he felt because of his history…well, it made my heart hurt for him.

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Kai was very good at being a Duke’s son, and for a while he liked being wicked, but underneath all of that was a thick layer of guilt and self-hatred, which always seemed to eat at him. Throughout this trilogy, he struggled with the actions of his past, and in “Sweet Temptation” it was painfully evident how much he regretted most of the things in his life. This book was fairly heavy and gritty because it dealt with a ton of different issues that plague the world like addiction and human trafficking, but I appreciated the fast that Wendy Higgins did not sugar coat the topics that were in this book. I loved that Wendy wrote such an amazing story of overcoming for her characters, and it was wonderful to see firsthand the growth that Kai experienced over the course of the “Sweet” books, how he eventually conquered his fears and addictions and helped Anna stay strong, too. Kai’s story was beautiful, amazing, and heart wrenching, and I loved seeing and experiencing his journey through his eyes. Oh, gosh, and the epilogue of the “Sweet Trilogy” from Kai’s perspective was SO beautiful that I might have cried.

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I loved how amazingly well paced “Sweet Temptation” felt despite how condensed it was, and if you’ve read the other books in Wend Higgins’s “Sweet Trilogy” and enjoyed them, then heartily recommend “Sweet Temptation” to you. Kaidan’s perspective, although much darker than Anna’s, was amazing to read from because it helped to round out this entire series and made me understand and love Kaidan even more as a character. Without a doubt, Kai’s book was by far my favorite “Sweet” book, and I can’t wait to see what Wendy Higgins writes next!

The Lies About Truth by Courtney C. Stevens

The Lies About Truth by Courtney C Stevens

“The Lies About Truth” by Courtney C. Stevens

Publishing House: HarperTeen

Release Date: November 3rd, 2015

Quality of Writing: 4 out of 5 stars.

How much I enjoyed it: 3 out of 5 stars.

Goodreads summary:

“Sadie Kingston, is a girl living in the aftermath. A year after surviving a car accident that killed her friend Trent and left her body and face scarred, she can’t move forward. The only person who seems to understand her is Trent’s brother, Max.

As Sadie begins to fall for Max, she’s unsure if she is truly healed enough to be with him — even if Max is able to look at her scars and not shy away. But when the truth about the accident and subsequent events comes to light, Sadie has to decide if she can embrace the future or if she’ll always be trapped in the past.”

Thank you, HarperTeen, for hosting the giveaway on goodreads and for sending me an ARC of this book. In no way has this influenced my review.

“The Lies About Truth” was a pretty good contemporary book. It had a lot of depth to it because of the issues that Courtney C. Stevens dealt with, and I thought that the character were well-written. I can see why people like “The Lies About Truth,” because it was a very good book, but it just did not click for me.

There are a lot of moments in my life when I wonder what’s wrong with me and why I don’t like something that seems, from all appearances, so good? I felt that way about this book because, even though it was well-written and had a great, emotional story, I just did not connect with the characters or the story. I could appreciate it and the journey that the heroine and her friends went on, but I did not fall in love with the heart of the story. I feel like whenever I read a novel by Katie McGarry, I am completely emotionally invested in the story she tells and the characters she writes; her books capture my heart, and that’s all there is too it. Sadly, I didn’t get that feeling of being emotionally drawn into the story or invested in the characters, despite their tumultuous circumstances and really wanting to connect with them. “The Lies About Truth” had a great story and well-developed characters for the genre, but for some odd and frustrating reason, I could not get into Sadie’s story.

Sadie was a great contemporary fiction heroine; she had secrets and had been through a lot, but she was not the kind of female character who grated on my nerves because of her more depressive inner thoughts. I was okay with her perspective because it was understandable considering what she had been through, and I did honestly want to see her break free of her fears and past hurts. I also thought that the emails between Max and her were very cute, and I liked that the two of them, who had been the most effected by the crash, were able to lean on one another and accept each other when they needed it most. I thought that Courtney Stevens did a good job of writing Sadie and the journey to self-acceptance that her character experience; it really was a lovely evolution, even though I did not feel super invested in this book.

Maxwell was also a good character, and the relationship that existed between him and Sadie because of the crash that took his brother’s life. One of the things that I loved seeing about both him and Sadie was how they accepted the “new” versions of each other, and where others might have seen flaws, they just saw a friend and someone who could understood them. I think that most people can relate, in one way or another, to the feeling that comes with finding a person who may or may not know every thought in your head, but they still understand you. While reading “The Lies About Truth,” I felt like Max and Sadie had that, which warmed my heart towards this book’s story and characters a bit more; I still didn’t feel attached or all that invested in the story, but I definitely appreciated that aspect of the it.

Overall, I thought that “The Lies About Truth” was a very good contemporary read. It was mature but clean, and I thought that Courtney C. Stevens handled the issues of self-image and self-acceptance quite well, despite not being that attached to her characters. This book was a bit predictable at times because the issues it dealt with are so commonly used now in young adult fiction, but isn’t that why we read certain contemporary novels, because we know how it will go and that it will end happily? “The Lies About Truth” was a good book, even though it was not necessarily my favorite contemporary story.