Les Petits Bonheurs #27…

Labor Day weekend was pretty crazy this year! School and work have kept me busier than I would like, and I wish that I had the energy to read for fun after finishing work and studying. Sadly, it has been about a month since I have picked up a book for enjoyment, but that did not stop me from going crazy at Barnes and Noble this last week with buying every book and vinyl record that I could get my hands on. Yeah, call me greedy, but when there are amazing sales and 40% off the vinyl soundtrack of Disney’s”Cinderella,” one must become a little cupide, as the French say. And let me tell you, the music from “Cinderella” has never sounded better than it does on vinyl, and I just adore relaxing to this classic soundtrack!

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Over the weekend, I also decided to get another vinyl by one of my favorite artists, and I might have also bought, like, five other books. For blog related research, of course…

I’m still cringing at how much I spent, but seriously, how can a girl resist the most magical store on earth when it has a 40% coupon just calling her name? It came to the point where my battery had to die on my computer before I could stop purchasing books and vinyl albums.

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Yeah, we’re going to be paying those items off for a little bit, but it was a wild ride! Thanks for visiting my blog today, and hopefully I’ll see you soon with a new review!

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P.S. I Like You by Kasie West

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“P.S. I Like You” by Kasie West

4 out of 5 stars.

Goodreads summary:

What if the person you were falling for was a total mystery?

While Lily is spacing out in Chemistry one day, she picks up her pencil and scribbles a line from one of her favorite songs on the desk. The next day, someone else has written back to her on the desk! Soon enough Lily and the mystery student are exchanging notes, and lyrics, and even sharing secrets. When Lily finds out that her anonymous pen pal is a guy, she’s flustered — and kind of feels like she’s falling for him. She and her best friend set out to unravel the identity of the letter writer — but when the truth is revealed, the guy is the LAST person Lily could have ever imagined it to be. Now that Lily knows the truth, can she untangle her feelings and gather the courage to listen to her heart?

From beloved author Kasie West (The Distance Between Us) comes an utterly charming story about mixed messages, missed connections, and the magic of good old-fashioned secret admirer notes.

This review is going to be short and (hopefully) sweet. “P.S. I Like You” was the perfect summertime fluff, and I just adore Kasie West as an author for how she consistently delivers adorable, heart-warming YA contemporary novels. I love how entertaining and engaging Kasie’s books always are, and “P.S. I Like You” was so charming and sweet, from it fun characters to its fabulously adorable cover, that I couldn’t put it down! (P.S. I want the filter that they used for the cover shoot. It’s like the unicorn of filters, leaving magic in its wake!)

Lily was a pretty relatable teen character, and I liked how Kasie West made Lily’s family a key part of “P.S. I Like You”; there were no disappearing parents or lack of supervision on their part, and I appreciate how “real” the family dynamics came across in this book. It was refreshing to read about a high school girl who had boundaries and limits because she was underage, and I enjoyed the fact that Lily owned up to her familial obligations, rather than being the overdone rebellious teen who ditched her family so that she could do whatever she wanted. I also liked that Kasie wrote a more realistic teenager by having her character’s parents not buy her a car, or with how Lily had to babysit to get her beloved guitar. Most YA contemporaries have these rebellious teens as their stars, and the kids have cars and/or family’s with money, but somehow zero parental supervision. It was refreshing to see the other, more average side to YA contemporary that Kasie West chose to show, and I feel like Kasie approach in this book made me enjoy her character and her journey even more as a reader.

Besides Lily being a fairly relatable character because of her realistic (and average) lifestyle, I thought that Kasie did a great job of showing her character grow as an individual. Lily had some things that she needed to work through in “P.S. I Like You,” and although they weren’t insurmountable problems, they were realistic to some of the issues that high schoolers deal with in this generation. I also thought that the letters were pretty cute, despite the fact that Lily’s “Dear John” was easy to spot.

*Sighs* About Lily’s Dear John…Although the letters were cute, I’m not sure that I bought into the boy outside of his letters to Lily; they were sweet and all, but how he behaved in reality didn’t appeal to me as a reader. For most of this book the boy behind the letters was cute, but the entire time I was wondering how Kasie was going to make me like the actual Dear John, who I did not initially like in “P.S. I Like You.” I know he’d had a rough past and it explained a few of the things that he did, but I still felt like it was more of an excuse than anything else for how he acted during the first half of this book.

Despite not completely buying into Lily’s letter-writer, I did see some similarities between “P.S. I Like You” and “Pride and Prejudice,” although I do not believe Kasie West intended her novel to mirror the classic literature piece. Some of the pride and prejudices between the main characters and the initial rudeness of the Dear John character reminded me a little bit of those same themes in Austen’s novel. I get that this book’s premise was that there’s always more to a person’s story, and that sometimes our perceptions and judgments of a someone can be wrong, as was the case with Dear John. But I do wish that I’d had more time with the real Dear John that Lily fell for, because I liked that version a lot, instead of “seeing” mostly the jerk that Lily’s point of view initially portrayed him as. I guess my perception of this character was slightly skewed because I had been reading about how much Lily disliked him, even though I knew he was going to be the romantic interest. Maybe when I read this book again, I will like Dear John a bit more because I will have a better understanding of his character, and can then forgive his Darcy-esk style of hiding his feelings, when he actually genuinely cared for people. It may take me some time, but I can get there…

Overall, “P.S. I like You” was a really sweet, quick read. I liked Lily and the personal growth that she showed by the end of this book, and I appreciated Kasie West’s choice in how prominent a role Lily’s family played in “P.S. I Like You,” and it was refreshing to see a more realistic family dynamic in a YA contemporary novel. My only disappointment with this book was that I did not fall head-over-heels for the main guy character; the boy behind the letters took ¾ of the book to “show up,” and I felt like I was deprived of really getting to know him like I wanted to, because his letter were all I had to make me like him for most of this book. Other than not being in love with the Dear John character of “P.S. I Like You,” I did really like this book in its entirety, and I really admire Kasie West for her consistency in writing such adorable and good quality YA contemporary novels.

P.S. Do yourself a favor and end your summer on a sweet note by picking “P.S. I Like” and reading it. You won’t regret it!

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My Lady Jane by Cynthia Hand, Brodi Ashton, and Jodi Meadows

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“My Lady Jane” by Cynthia Hand,

Brodi Ashton, and Jodi Meadows

5 out of 5 stars.

Goodreads summary:

Edward (long live the king) is the King of England. He’s also dying, which is inconvenient, as he’s only sixteen and he’d much rather be planning for his first kiss than considering who will inherit his crown…

Jane (reads too many books) is Edward’s cousin, and far more interested in books than romance. Unfortunately for Jane, Edward has arranged to marry her off to secure the line of succession. And there’s something a little odd about her intended…

Gifford (call him G) is a horse. That is, he’s an Eðian (eth-y-un, for the uninitiated). Every day at dawn he becomes a noble chestnut steed—but then he wakes at dusk with a mouthful of hay. It’s all very undignified.

The plot thickens as Edward, Jane, and G are drawn into a dangerous conspiracy. With the fate of the kingdom at stake, our heroes will have to engage in some conspiring of their own. But can they pull off their plan before it’s off with their heads?

I have been a Lady Janie since Cynthia Hand and her co-authors first announced that they were writing a historical retelling of Lady Jane Grey’s life together, and that they were going to put a “The Princess Bride” twist on historical fact (i.e. minimal historical accuracy. ;-D). I have been on board with Cynthia, Brodi, and Jodi’s idea since the beginning, completely geeking out whenever a new announcement for their work-in-progress popped up on twitter or in my email (yep, it’s a fangirl life for me!), and I am here today (a month later than I intended) to tell you all that “My Lady Jane” was a success!

“My Lady Jane” was utterly ridiculous in the best possible way, and I am so happy that the authors of this novel were able to (fantastically, I might add) pull off writing such a charming and humorous story. Books like “My Lady Jane’ can be terribly difficult to write because of the ridiculousness and improbability of their storylines; the point is for them to be that way, obviously, but if the authors can’t get the humor across to their readers, then the whole story falls flat. “My Lady Jane,” however, was a success because of how adorable and charming the characters were, and the humor and situational comedy came across quite perfectly for the kind of story that these authors were telling. I also adored the fact that it did indeed remind me of “The Princess Bride,” which was one of my favorite movies growing up (wait for me, my dear Wesley!), and there were definitely moments where I saw the book by William Goldman influencing this novel’s style of writing as well (lots of parenthesis framing hilarious inner monologues or comedic observations of the authors). The odes to one of my favorite movies and its comical book were fantastic, and I definitely found myself laughing at the randomness of certain moments and the amusing situations that the characters were placed in. But what truly made me love “My Lady Jane,” besides this novel’s wonderful cover and alluring deckled-edged pages, was how charming and endearing Cynthia, Brodi, and Jodi’s characters were.

Lady Jane Grey was a fantastic heroine to read about, whether she be the girl from the history books or the one that this book portrayed. Jane was clever, adorable, and her dedication to being honest and kind to those around her made her a very likeable main character, and I really enjoyed her perspective in “My Lady Jane.” I thought that Jodi Meadows did a wonderful job of capturing the essence of the real young woman whose life was cut short by the blood/political feud between the Catholic Mary and the Protestants in charge of England, and even though I knew the historical facts of Jane’s life that these lovely authors were about to wreak havoc on, I felt the anxiety of Jane’s dire situation. Jane was a pawn in the hands of a bunch of lecherous dirt bags who cared more about power than what the country actually needed, and I think that made Jane kind of heroine who is easy to root for. The truth behind the real girl’s life is heartbreaking, so I was happy that this book took, um, some liberties with the historical details recorded about Lady Jane Grey’s life, while still keeping the heart of the girl the same. Jane was smart and caring, and I appreciated the mix of seriousness with comedy that the authors of “My Lady Jane” put into her situation. Added to the pleasure of reading Jane’s perspective was that I got to see her relationship with Gifford develop, albeit comically, over the course of this novel, and I ended up really enjoying Gifford as a character as well.

Gifford (A.K.A. G) was beyond entertaining to read about. There was a fabulous comedy behind this character’s personality as well as his situation, and I definitely laughed out loud a few times with the things he did, or the kinds of trouble he got into by becoming Jane’s husband. But beyond just being funny, I liked Gifford because he had a good heart and he respected Jane despite their differences in opinion at times. Gifford experienced a fair amount of character growth over the course of this book, and I liked the fact that he had a couple of moments where he had to choose to let Jane go to do what she needed to, even though all he wanted to do was protect her. I also liked the fact that Brodi Ashton wrote him some very real reactions in the moments where he was faced with only difficult choices that were in opposition to his desire to protect Jane. Those situations caused him to do something that wasn’t necessarily okay, but was an understandable response to seeing someone he loved in danger. The give and take of Jane and Gifford’s relationship made me extremely happy, and I thought that how this book’s authors dealt with that specific moment between Gifford and Jane and its repercussions was really well done.

I liked the whole progression of this book and where Gifford’s character went. I loved the fact that this book and its characters made me laugh and even tear up just a little at times, and I really appreciated the little touch of history and fiction that Cynthia, Brodi, and Jodi added with Gifford etching Jane’s name into the wall of his cell in the Tower of London. That made me cry just a little bit when it happened in “My Lady Jane,” and I cried some more when I figured out that it was true.

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Jane and Gifford’s relationship was pretty hilarious to begin with, but I liked the fact that I shipped them together from the beginning of “My Lady Jane” despite the lack of romance at times, and I only grew more fond of them as individuals and a couple as this book progressed. I liked that they discovered a little bit of the give and take of a partnership, and even though “My Lady Jane” did not take course over much time at all, I never felt like anything was rushed or forced with the romance. It was mildly torturous, but I also liked the “Ladyhawke” moments that played a part in how much time Gifford and Jane spent together; it built the tension a little bit, which kept me reading in order to get to those brief but heartwarming moments of them together! Jane and Gifford’s relationship was sweet and endearing, and I thought that this novel’s authors did a fantastic job of balancing the comedic themes in it with things like Jane and Gifford’s relationship, which added depth to this story so that it was not only fun ridiculousness.

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Edward was a good character, but he wasn’t my favorite one in “My Lady Jane.” His perspective was pretty entertaining and engaging most of the time, but it took some time for him to grow on me, unlike Gifford and Jane whom I instantly connected with as a reader. Edward experienced some good character growth over the course of this book, and I think that I will like him more as a character when I read “My Lady Jane” again. Being impatient for another character’s perspective definitely puts a slight damper on the growing relationship between another character and their reader, and that was kind of what happened with Edward for me; I wanted more of Jane and Gifford, so I did not enjoy Edward’s perspective as much as I would have if I had not been constantly looking forward to the other characters’ point of views. Despite him not being my favorite character, Edward did have an entertaining perspective to read from, and I think that my next time reading “My Lady Jane” I will like him more as a character.

“My Lady Jane” was truly a joy to read, with its fantastic characters, great comedic timing, and happy twist on a sad story that has been collecting dust in the history books for quite some time. I loved Jane as a character, and this book made me want to discover more about who the real Lady Jane Grey was, which made me quite happy; any book that fascinates me enough to cause me to seek out historical fact is a winner in my opinion. Gifford exceed my expectations for a hilarious, sweet, and endearing character, and I adored him and Jane as a couple. “My Lady Jane’ was the perfect balance of funny, awkward, and sweet for me, and I can’t wait to see what this trio of authors will write together next time.

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Amy and Roger’s Epic Detour by Morgan Matson

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“Amy and Roger’s Epic Detour” by Morgan Matson

3 1/2 out of 5 stars.

Goodreads summary:

Amy Curry is not looking forward to her summer. Her mother decided to move across the country and now it’s Amy’s responsibility to get their car from California to Connecticut. The only problem is, since her father died in a car accident, she isn’t ready to get behind the wheel. Enter Roger. An old family friend, he also has to make the cross-country trip – and has plenty of baggage of his own. The road home may be unfamiliar – especially with their friendship venturing into uncharted territory – but together, Amy and Roger will figure out how to map their way.”

So, my plans for this summer have included an epic detour of mostly rereading my favorite books and some new YA contemporary novels, so I thought that it would be the perfect time to pick up “Amy and Roger’s Epic Detour” by Morgan Matson.

Morgan Matson’s debut Ya book felt like a little slice of summer inside of a book. It was fun and adventurous, while also having a surprising weight to the storyline because of Amy’s newly chaotic and broken life, which was the result of her father’s passing. The travel aspects of this book were so great, and the details that went into the design of “Amy and Roger’s Epic Detour” was perfect; it felt like an adorable summer journal with all of the random receipts and pictures and fabulous playlists, and with how there were moments of personal revelation.

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I loved the fact that I read Morgan’s book right after “Love and Gelato” by Jenna Evans Welch because of how both books made for fantastic travel “destinations,” and now I really want to take an adventure, whether it be driving across the country or backpacking through Europe. Fun adventures aside, the characters of “Amy and Roger’s Epic Detour” were also really great, and I enjoyed the fact that it centered around just Amy and Roger because of how short a period of time this book spanned.

I liked reading Amy’s perspective, and despite the terribly sad and heartbreaking circumstances which led up to her being forced to travel with Roger, I never felt like this book was too heavy or depressing. “Amy and Roger’s Epic Detour” definitely tugged on my heartstrings as Amy learned to feel alive again after feeling so horribly broken after her father’s tragic accident, but those sad moments never overshadowed the fact that this book was about adventure, doing things out of your comfort zone, and learning something new about yourself and the world and people who are around you. Amy had an enjoyable perspective to read from, and I liked the fact that her story added depth and weight to what could have been just a fluff contemporary. It was nice to see a character who experienced a lot of growth as an individual, even if it was a tiny bit over-reaching considering how little time “Amy and Roger’s Epic Detour” took place over. Amy was great, and I enjoyed how she and Roger got to know each other as they explored some of the hidden jems of the United States.

Roger was pretty adorable. He reminded me a little bit of Frank Porter from Morgan Matson’s book, “Since You’ve Been Gone,” and he ended up being a cute, good guy, with just a sprinkle of mystery surrounding him at the beginning of this book. I liked how he helped Amy come out from behind her protective walls, and they were pretty cute together. I did, however, feel like their romance developed a little too quickly for the short time period that “Amy and Roger”s Epic Detour” took place over, but since I had so much fun reading and learning about all of the amazing places that Amy and Roger went, I let it slide.

“Amy and Roger’s Epic Detour” was a great summer read, and I’m so glad that I finally picked it up this summer. Morgan Matson is a great contemporary writer, and I think that she always finds a good balance sweet and sentimental with some good coming of age fun. “Since You’ve Been Gone” is still my favorite Morgan Matson book, but “Amy and Roger’s Epic Detour” was still a really sweet and enjoyable read. There’s not much else I can say about “Amy and Roger’s Epic Detour,” other than recommend it to anyone looking for a fun, enjoyable coming of age story with some fabulous road mixes to pass the time. 😉

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